Will Brown Mess With Anti-Quota Law?

DEC. 10, 2010

K. LLOYD BILLINGSLEY

A federal judge has upheld Proposition 209, the California law that bars racial, ethnic and gender preferences in state employment, education and contracting. The voter-approved measure has met legal challenges before but remains under attack.

The Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, the pro-racial-preference group By Any Means Necessary, and 56 California students filed a lawsuit against Proposition 209, which California voters approved in 1996. The suit charged that the measure violates the civil rights of native Americans, blacks and Latinos.

On Dec. 8, federal judge Samuel Conti dismissed the lawsuit, and his ruling noted that Proposition 209 had already been upheld by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals against similar action.

Yvette Felarca of By Any Means Necessary told reporters that BAMN will appeal and seek support from newly elected California Gov. Jerry Brown. Brown opposes Proposition 209 and as California Attorney General recently supported a San Francisco plan that gave preference to “women and minorities” in contracting.

The California Supreme Court upheld Proposition 209 in that case.  Now California’s High Speed Rail Authority has come under fire for similar reasons.

The Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights, based in San Francisco, and the Associated Professionals and Contractors, charge that the rail project has not made sufficient effort to recruit minority contractors. The complaints ignore both Proposition 209 and the reality that California has no ethnic majority.

As the 2000 Census revealed, non-Hispanic whites are nearly 47 percent, Hispanics are 32.4 percent, Asians 10.8 percent, African-Americans 6.4 percent, American Indian and Alaska natives 0.9 percent, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders 0.3 percent, “some other race” 0.2 percent, and “two or more races” 4.7 percent.

The diversity prompted then-Lt. Governor Cruz Bustamante to say,  “If there is no majority, maybe there are no minorities.”

Proposition 209, also known as the California Civil Rights Initiative, does not ban “affirmative action” outright as some reports contend. State entities such as the University of California may consider a student’s economic need as a factor in admissions.

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  1. JoeS
    JoeS 11 December, 2010, 08:07

    Are you kidding? The universities have never followed the law. That is what “comprehensive review” is.

    Just remember, every affirmative action admission is purely discrimination against Asian students. Pure Racism! These liberals are covering up the disgusting state of inner-city education. Punish Asian students for studying harder.

    If black and hispanic students want to go to better universities, they need to quit supporting the political party that is owned by the teachers unions. Did any of you go to “Waiting for Superman?” The facts are clear. The only solution is vouchers for all students.

    Reply this comment
  2. Dean Smith
    Dean Smith 11 December, 2010, 22:42

    Racism has always been a staple of the left. Many a white liberal has become rich advocating for the “poor and minorities”. Women, minorities, and the poor just about covers the entire planet. Where’s the majority???

    Reply this comment
  3. Charles
    Charles 11 December, 2010, 23:29

    When I was going to junior college in San Diego in 1969 I worked a full time job as a dishwasher. I had to support myself. At the same time another dishwasher at the same place going to the same junior college was receiving government grants because he was black. He lived at home and didn’t have to pay rent or have any of the expenses I had.

    Get rid of quotas. They are unfair.

    Reply this comment
  4. GoneWithTheWind
    GoneWithTheWind 14 December, 2010, 20:23

    Would that make the case Brown vs board of education??

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