Poll: Californians think higher ed is too expensive, love the quality

belushi collegeCalifornians are concerned over the cost of the state’s public colleges and universities, just as two of the state’s three higher-education systems are considering tuition increases.

In fact, only 13 percent of Californians say it’s not a problem, while 57 percent say it’s a big problem, according to a poll released Thursday night by the Public Policy Institute of California. 

Just below half of Californians think affordability is the biggest issue facing California’s higher-education systems, while only 15 percent think quality is the top problem. 

“With many Californians saying that affordability is the most important problem facing public higher education, there is overwhelming support for free community college and for expanding student scholarships,” said Mark Baldassare, PPIC president and CEO.

Paying for it?

Both the Cal State and the University of California systems are considering tuition increases. And while that is sure to be unpopular, Californians don’t seem to like the alternatives: 74 percent oppose increasing student fees, 50 percent oppose higher taxes, and 50 percent oppose increasing tuition for out-of-state students.

But despite opposing higher taxes, strong majorities of Californians support increased government funding to make college more affordable — 73 percent of adults think community college should be free, while 82 percent of adults want the government to pay for more scholarships and grants for students attending four-year institutions. 

School bond

To fund new construction projects, 65 percent of Californians support a bond measure for higher-education facilities. That outpaces November’s results, when 55 percent of voters approved a $9-billion construction bond for K-12 and community colleges. 

8 comments

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  1. Richard Rider
    Richard Rider 8 December, 2016, 22:46

    Yes, most Californians think higher education is too expensive. They know this is true because that’s what the media tells them. And the media in not in the business of investigative journalism — not hardly?

    Almost no one knows the facts. Let me help.

    To start with, our public colleges tuition is NOT high compared to the other states. But that’s just for starters. Consider:

    California, a destitute state, still gives away community college education at fire sale prices. Our CC tuition and fees are the lowest in the nation.  How low?  Nationwide, the average community college tuition and fees are more than double our California CC’s.
    http://trends.collegeboard.org/college-pricing/figures-tables/tuition-and-fees-sector-and-state-over-time

    This ridiculously low CC tuition devalues education to students – often resulting in a 25+% drop rate for class completion in the liberal arts courses.  In addition, because of grants and tax credits, up to 2/3 of California CC students pay no net tuition at all!   
    http://tinyurl.com/ygqz9ls

    Complaints about increased UC student fees too often ignore a key point — all poor and many middle class CA students don’t pay the UC “fees” (our state’s euphemism for tuition).  There are no fees for most California families with under $80K income. 55% of all undergraduate CA UC students pay zero tuition, and another 14% pay only partial tuition. http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/blueandgold/
    and
    tinyurl.com/UC-zero

    Reply this comment
  2. fredtyg
    fredtyg 9 December, 2016, 09:20

    The high price of college education is only a big deal if you think college is a necessity. I’d suggest most jobs can be handled without a college education. Some jobs may require a college education, but they can still be done without one, but that’s a cultural problem in that everyone thinks they need to go to college.

    An example comes to mind. I have two nephews with the same parents. Their father was big on college so paid for #1’s college education and #1 graduated.

    He insisted #2 go to college but #2 refused in a family squabble in which I took part and said #2 shouldn’t feel the need to go to college.

    Fast forward years later. Nephew #1, with the college degree, is unemployed with no plans to get a job and can’t even feed himself. He’s 42 and still eating at his parent’s house.

    #2 moved out of the area, started a band and is making his own way on musical tours.

    I’m sure there are many similar examples to be found.

    Reply this comment
  3. fredtyg
    fredtyg 9 December, 2016, 09:23

    I might add, if education through high school was proper, kids would know how to read, write and do math. As it is, they apparently don’t.

    I had a friend who was college- centric. I pointed out the above to which he replied, “High school is where you learn to learn. College is where you actually learn”. That seems to me to be part of our cultural problem with college.

    Reply this comment
  4. Pop's
    Pop's 9 December, 2016, 15:15

    I was born in Southern California in 1950, I have seen the problems grow greater and greater, especially since the 1960’s. Generally now, we are now under the leadership of the hippy generation, the generation that was unable to think critically, the generation with no morals, no ethics and no nothing.. we’ve, (America) been going downhill for 35+ years now and will continue to do so. Life was much more stable growing up around the people of the depression and WWII, they actually had to grow up early on in their lives..

    Reply this comment
  5. Lansing
    Lansing 9 December, 2016, 15:17

    I was born in Southern California in 1950, I have seen the problems grow greater and greater, especially since the 1960’s. Generally now, we are now under the leadership of the hippy generation, the generation that was unable to think critically, the generation with no morals, no ethics and no nothing.. we’ve, (America) been going downhill for 35+ years now and will continue to do so. Life was much more stable growing up around the people of the depression and WWII, they actually had to grow up early on in their lives..

    Reply this comment
  6. eck
    eck 9 December, 2016, 19:44

    If most Californians were aware of how little many of the graduates of these institutions knew, they might change their mind about the quality. I have contact with many recent CA college grads. Most have been infused with doctrine, not knowledge. Especially compared with grads of 20-30 years ago. Appalling.

    Reply this comment
    • Pop's
      Pop's 9 December, 2016, 20:14

      That’s for sure!
      Plus they don’t teach any wisdom… lots of knowledge but no wisdom…

      Reply this comment
  7. Queeg
    Queeg 10 December, 2016, 09:35

    Comrades

    The key to California is a career/ vocation not influenced by slaver Globalists and totally portable to anywhere.

    I know a young man who wasted five years of his life in Cal State Universities and one year becoming a Microsoft engineer type…..

    He sits on top of the world!

    Reply this comment

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