California on edge of green-power blackouts?

North Korea, South Korea lightsMarch 2, 2013

By Wayne Lusvardi

Check out the nearby satellite photograph of North Korea at night, showing it as a sea of darkness from  lack of electrical infrastructure compared to glare of lights from modern, industrialized, capitalist South Korea, Japan and China.

California never could get as bad as North Korea. But its current policies could lead to sporadic blackouts that would produce a map showing our state with the lights out.

At a special meeting of California energy companies and regulators held Feb. 26, Todd Strauss of Pacific Gas & Electric saw the possibility of state power blackouts emerging in 2013 to 2015.  The reason is that it has suddenly dawned on state power regulators that green power has resulted in a precarious lack of system flexibility in the state’s power grid.

Said Steve Berberich, the head of the California Independent System Operator, “The problem is we have a system now that needs flexibility, not capacity.”

The blackouts during the the California electricity crisis of 2000-01 were caused by a lack of sufficient energy capacity. But now, what experts at Feb. 26 meeting agreed is that any future state energy crisis likely will come from lack of system flexibility.  The diminishing flexibility is a result of the state’s 2011 mandate, signed by Gov. Jerry Brown, that 33 percent of all energy must be from green power sources by 2020.

Oddly, California’s 33 percent renewable energy mandate results in too much capacity from redundant conventional gas-fired power plants needed to backup unpredictable green power.  But it also leads to a reduction in system flexibility.

Green power results in low voltage 

The wind and sun are highly fluctuating sources of energy.  Thus the power grid becomes more precarious because of a lack of voltage needed to push electrons through power lines.  Voltage is like water pressure between two points in a pipeline.  Either there has to be gravity for water to flow or a pump to lift the water to a higher point.

In a similar fashion, there has to be enough voltage in the power grid for the electrons to flow. The typical voltage required to transmit electricity from power-generating stations is 110 kilovolts to 1,200 kilovolts.

Green power typically is produced in surges, or can result in sudden drops in voltage. The lack of wind stops wind-power generation; and the arrival of nightfall ends solar energy generation.

Just as loss of water pressure in a pipeline results in no water flow, a sudden drop or spike in voltage can lead to a power blackout.

What flexibility means is the need for more power plants with the capability to ramp power up or down quickly to respond to vacillations in green power when the wind doesn’t blow or the sun doesn’t shine.  Coal power plants cannot typically respond fast enough to provide backup power.  So this means that greater reliance on natural gas-fired power plants.

The future problem for California is that it does not have the right mix of types of power plants and new environmental regulations are forcing either closure or expensive upgrades to its coastal power plants that rely on ocean water for cooling steam generators.

Regulation 316 (b) of the Clean Water Act

Of particular concern at the meeting was compliance with regulation 316 (b) of the U.S. Clean Water Act.  It requires power plants no longer to use ocean water for cooling steam turbines.  Instead, power plants that have used ocean water for cooling will have to shift to expensive air-cooling towers. This is called “once-through cooling.”  The purpose of 316 (b) is to reduce affects on aquatic life such as fish larvae sucked into power-plant water intakes.

Nineteen power plants in California will be subject to shut downs for conversion to air cooling or will have to be decommissioned where the costs to retrofit the plants will be prohibitive.

A map of the power plants is below, followed by a list of the plants. Notice the large number along the Pacific coast.

California power plants

Alamitos Generating Station

Contra Costa Power Plant

Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant

El Segundo Generating Station

Encina Power Station

Harbor Generating Station

Haynes Generating Station

Humboldt Bay Power Plant

Huntington Beach Generating Station

Mandalay Generating Station

Morro Bay Power Plant

Moss Landing Power Plant

Ormond Beach Generating Station

Pittsburgh Power Plant

Potrero Power Plant

Redondo Beach Generating Station

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

Scattergood Generation Station

South Bay Power Plant

9 comments

Write a comment
  1. Tom Tanton
    Tom Tanton 2 March, 2013, 07:02

    We need some flexibility in the political process as much as the physical infrastructure. We wouldn’t need so much physical flexibility (which comes at high capital costs and negative efficiency impacts) if the political process allowed for recognizing that the RPS is in fact a large sink hole, with few actual benefits.

    Reply this comment
  2. The Modified Ted Steele Methodologies (tm)
    The Modified Ted Steele Methodologies (tm) 2 March, 2013, 07:49

    modern nuke power is great—shut down the antiquated, leaking, discharging, safety violating SONGS — San O… Even the libertarian OC Register is 100% behind the closure……….

    Reply this comment
  3. BobA
    BobA 2 March, 2013, 09:38

    Tom Tanton:

    The people selling RPS knew this going in but when the government starts throwing money around in pursuit of a mythical power source, why not tell them what they want to hear and take the money? A lot of people have gotten rich and no one has went to jail for scamming the tax payers. Scamming people out of their money is entirely legal as long as its the government who’s doing the scamming.

    So-called green energy is not new. How long has windmills been around? Solar power and so-called “biofuels? If they were a practical and reliable source of power it would have been done hundreds of years ago.

    Nikola Tesla single-handedly changes the world with his invention of alternating current, Hydroelectric power, AC generators and motor and so forth but he was not satisfied. But he had an even better idea: wireless power. His problem was that he was not a greedy capitalist and thought electricity should be free. Thomas Edison and JP Morgan, greedy capitalists, made sure his ideas of wireless power never saw the light of day.

    The greatest inventor in human history died penniless because he never sought a dime for any of his inventions. His inventions includes radar, radio, radio remote control, radio astronomy, and many more in the late 1800s early 1900s.

    He is remembered in physics and electrical engineering by the magnetic flux density measurement unit appropriately called the Tesla. Today, the science and engineering world are beginning to explore Tesla’s ideas. Ideas he came up with in the late 1800s.

    Reply this comment
  4. Bob Morris (@polizeros)
    Bob Morris (@polizeros) 2 March, 2013, 09:43

    Meanwhile, much of CA energy, especially from SoCal, comes from coal on Indian land in other states.

    Reply this comment
  5. stevefromsacto
    stevefromsacto 2 March, 2013, 11:13

    “California never could get as bad as North Korea.”

    Glad you clarified that, Wayne. Given your constant whining about how awful things are in our great state, I read the first paragraph with some trepidation.

    Reply this comment
  6. Way too much science
    Way too much science 2 March, 2013, 11:23

    This is gibberish to a California electorate that was educated by districts with missions such as “Opportunity. Equity. Social Justice.” (See http://www.sjeccd.edu)

    What’s an electron? Someone who elects Obama?

    …power grid becomes more precarious because of a lack of voltage needed to push electrons through power lines. Voltage is like water pressure between two points in a pipeline. Either there has to be gravity for water to flow or a pump to lift the water to a higher point. In a similar fashion, there has to be enough voltage in the power grid for the electrons to flow. The typical voltage required to transmit electricity from power-generating stations is 110 kilovolts to 1,200 kilovolts. Just as loss of water pressure in a pipeline results in no water flow, a sudden drop or spike in voltage can lead to a power blackout.

    Reply this comment
  7. Bill - San Jose
    Bill - San Jose 2 March, 2013, 16:35

    I have walked through 6 such plants that have come off the grid due to not being permitted to renew their PPA. They will be demolished.

    I can only say that we get what we deserve in this instance.

    We need more reservoirs providing more hydroelectric source if we are going to stop global warming and save the blinkin’ world.

    Mor
    Ons

    Reply this comment
  8. Jeff
    Jeff 2 March, 2013, 20:49

    CA is a financial, public policy and voter intelligence basket case of a state. This is further proof how far down the rabbit hole we’ve gone. There are no adults in the room in Sacramento.

    Reply this comment
  9. BobA
    BobA 3 March, 2013, 09:38

    Jeff:

    Rabbit hole? You can get out of a rabbit hole. California has gone past the event horizon of a black hole where this is no escape.

    I proffer that our state capital is a miniature black where all judgement and common sense gets crushed down to a quantum singularity with a leftover debris cloud of greed and corruption circulating just outside the event horizon.

    Reply this comment

Write a Comment

Your e-mail address will not be published.
Required fields are marked*



Related Articles

Water fight: Now it’s four bonds

For California’s water, now it’s dueling water bonds — four of them. First bond: On Friday, Senate Republicans refurbished their own

No ‘time out’ for city in rail authority’s cross-hairs

Dec. 21, 2012 By Chris Reed The nervousness is growing in Bakersfield as the California High-Speed Rail Authority moves toward

L.A. County takes thunder out of rain tax — for now

March 16, 2013 By Wayne Lusvardi On March 13, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors may have taken the