High-speed rail incompatible with current tracks

High-speed rail incompatible with current tracks

confederate-railroad-confederaterailroad.com_One reason the American South lost the Civil War was it had numerous incompatible railroad track systems, requiring supplies to be unloaded, then loaded again, for each different segment. By contrast, the Northern rail networks were more uniform, although not completely so.

That’s turning out to be a problem with the North-South California high-speed rail program. The Times reported:

“California’s bullet train officials begin to lay plans for the system’s Los Angeles segment, a major technical issue is coming under close scrutiny: incompatibility between the sleek, high-speed electric trains and the region’s older, diesel-powered commuter rail network.

“The state’s plan for initial passenger service calls for high-speed trains to shuttle between Merced and Burbank by 2022, a first leg of a $68-billion line that eventually is expected to link Los Angeles and San Francisco.

“Under the current design, Los Angeles-bound passengers pulling into Burbank, at least in the early years of operation, would have to transfer to a diesel-powered commuter train on another platform for the final 13-mile trip to downtown’s Union Station.”

It’s hard to see how walking is “high-speed.”

Perhaps it could be advertised as a rail trip and a fitness workout.

6 comments

Write a comment
  1. NTHEOC
    NTHEOC 15 December, 2014, 12:57

    Perhaps it could be advertised as a rail trip and a fitness workout.
    —————————————————-
    Who cares what it will be called or advertised as, it’s going to bring a lot of jobs with it and big money gov’t contracts to private sector companies!

    Reply this comment
    • Donkey
      Donkey 15 December, 2014, 16:20

      You have no idea how stupid you sound with your observation that “big money gov’t contracts to private sector companies!” The private sector has no more money left to pay for your government contracts you dimwit. 🙂

      Reply this comment
  2. Marino Aquisap
    Marino Aquisap 15 December, 2014, 15:26

    How about canceling that high-speed […] train system. I just can’t ingest the ignorance of the California voter’s approving a liberal utopian dream of high speed rail service. The current system is sufficient to sustain the amount of passenger usage and the price of fossil fuels are currently going below $2 a gallon. Disestablish the liberal monkey troglodytes in Sacramento to bring back the logic and sanity which once prevailed in what was a pro-constitution, pro-Bill of rights state. Socialism sucks and it never worked.

    Reply this comment
    • bob
      bob 16 December, 2014, 13:19

      “…price of fossil fuels are currently going below $2 a gallon.”

      Not in Colliefornia (as Ahnode calls it). You will NEVER see sub $2 a gallon gas or diesel in Colliefornia. In January the AB 32 tax kicks in and it increases every year after that. The more the price of oil falls the more the DemoNcrats will tax the shiite out of it and its by products.

      Reply this comment
  3. Ulysses Uhaul
    Ulysses Uhaul 15 December, 2014, 19:59

    Donkey

    That’s not nice. Bad Donkey. Bad.

    Reply this comment
  4. T Mind of your Ted Godhead System
    T Mind of your Ted Godhead System 16 December, 2014, 14:12

    BIG contracts (k’s) to huge private companies!

    We gotta have this train!

    CHOOOOOOOOOOOO CHOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

    Reply this comment

Write a Comment

Leave a Reply


Tags assigned to this article:
Civil Warhigh-speed railJohn SeilerConfederacy

Related Articles

Right-to-work states see union membership, revenues drop

With Friedrichs v. CTA pending before the U.S. Supreme Court, stakeholders and spectators alike are curious to see not only

Video: SNL’s new Obama character displays vapid campaign

Sept. 17, 2012 By John Seiler This year’s presidential campaign should be exciting. Instead, it’s the most vapid I’ve seen

Trial lawyers seek and win extreme verdict they know won’t stand

An insane court ruling led me to write this for the U-T San Diego: At a recent federal trial in San