Mixed GOP reaction to Donnelly: Dumb-de-dumb-dumb

Mixed GOP reaction to Donnelly: Dumb-de-dumb-dumb

California-Republican-PartyThe California Republican Party is now very, very down on its luck. But I think state party chair Jim Brulte isn’t just blathering when he suggests the party can make at the least a modest comeback.

The main reason for this, however, isn’t the behavior of California Republicans. It’s both a broad ideological trend and specific emerging problems in the Democratic coaltion.

The trend I refer to is the increasing emergence of tech libertarians in state politics. The rich ones are a potent source of money and lobbying clout. The young ones in Silicon Valley and elsewhere are a niche voting group likely to turn out on Election Day. They have little faith in government. Even if they’re mostly Democratic now, they’re not Dems because they want the leviathan to get bigger.

The specific emerging problems for Dems have to do with the fundamentally different agendas of key party factions.

The battle is already in the open between Asian Democrats and black/Latino Democrats over a return to explicit racial favoritism in UC admissions policies.

But with every year, we inch closer to the political equivalent of the Big One, in which Latino Democrats conclude Latino kids are not well-served by their lawmakers’ reflexive support of public education policies that value the interests of majority-white teachers unions over majority-Latino student bodies.

A crucial example of this can be seen in the race for state superintendent of public instruction. Former L.A. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa avidly supports reformer Marshall Tuck over incumbent/CTA tool Tom Torlakson. Villaraigosa has been a quasi-mentor to a generation of California Latino pols in their 20s and 30s. John Perez may still be a CTA/CFT lackey, but a lot of these emerging Latino pols are likely to be closer to Villaraigosa than to his fellow Angeleno Perez. Gloria Romero, another L.A. Dem, may yet be vindicated for her depiction of the priorities of the school system as being the biggest California civil rights issue.

Eager to excuse Donnelly’s abject racist stupidity

tim.donnellyBut even if all these issues break well for the GOP in California, will the party take advantage? A month ago, I’d have said yes. Now, after watching the mixed reaction to gubernatorial candidate Tim Donnelly’s abject racist stupidity about Neel Kashkari, his Indian-American opponent, I am far less sure. A party whose rank-and-file doesn’t grasp the need to cast this guy out of the village is doomed.

I wrote about Donnelly’s idiocy in the U-T San Diego:

“Donnelly could have cruised to the runoff simply by repeating over and over that Kashkari played a key role in the Troubled Asset Relief Program — the unpopular big-government scheme that Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama implemented to try to shore up the economy in 2008 and 2009.

“Instead, Donnelly has chosen to be a race-baiter. He has repeatedly depicted Kashkari as an advocate of extreme Islamic Sharia law because Kashkari once spoke at a conference in which Sharia finance was the focus.

“This is ridiculous. Kashkari is a Hindu of Indian descent who advocates free-market capitalism — not a Muslim cleric seeking religious control of government institutions.

“It is also odious, because Donnelly evidently hopes to gather votes from Californians by encouraging the idea that all people with dark skin whose ancestors hail from Asia are crypto-terrorists.

“Sadly, this may be something that Donnelly actually believes.”

And even if he does believe it, based on the online comments and emails I’ve seen, lots of GOPers are eager to forgive him for it.

Both Donnelly, Kashkari are ‘imperfect’

As well as some people who should know way, way better. FlashReport gave big play Sunday to a piece on the governor’s race in which author David Salaverry suggested there was some sort of moral equivalence between Donnelly’s Sharia manure and Kashkari’s criticizing Donnelly for taking government perks and being a bad businessman.

They’re both “imperfect” GOP candidates, you see.

Get used to being marginal, California Republicans. If you’re this obtuse, you deserve it.

This is not a defense of Kashkari. It takes chutzpah to run for the Republican nomination for governor in the largest state after admitting to voting in 2008 for the epic walking debacle that is Barack Obama. But at least Kashkari is not a racist dolt.

Like Tim Donnelly.

 

 

 

34 comments

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  1. Rex the Wonder Dog!
    Rex the Wonder Dog! 16 May, 2014, 11:31

    “Donnelly could have cruised to the runoff simply by repeating over and over that Kashkari played a key role in the Troubled Asset Relief Program — the unpopular big-government scheme that Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama implemented to try to shore up the economy in 2008 and 2009.

    94%!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! of Americans were AGAINST TARP!!!! 94%!

    Kash-N-Karry’s TARP role “helped” dole out other peoples money to his Wall Street buddies. There was no profit and loss accountability, it was your proto-typical government bureaucracy, an untrained circus chimp could have done what Kash-N-Karry did. And he thinks this some how qualifies him to be GOVERNOR???? Please, that would not get him elected dog catcher.

    And Donnelly, where does he or anyone else get the notion he is any better than Kash-N-Karry>????

    Jerry Clown is a dork, and he is not the savior of this state, but I would fear BOTH of these guys much more than Clown.

    Reply this comment
  2. David in the OC
    David in the OC 16 May, 2014, 15:07

    Marshall Tuck? Didn’t he used to tour with Molly Hatch?

    Reply this comment
  3. Steve Mehlman
    Steve Mehlman 16 May, 2014, 17:56

    Appreciate your honesty, Chris, at least the part about the Republican Party in California. But it is sad that it took you so long to understand what we have been warning about for years…that the party is threatened with takeover at the state and national levels by a group of intolerant, intransigent, obtuse fanatics. Tim Donnelly is their poster child.

    Reply this comment
    • Chris Reed
      Chris Reed Author 17 May, 2014, 00:16

      Steve, I didn’t just figure this out. I am a libertarian, not a Republican. I’ve been whining about GOP stands on the drug war, social issues, criminal justice, foreign policy, corporate subsidies, corporate rent-seeking, etc. for many years.

      You can hunt until your eyes fall out, and you won’t find me defending social conservatives or militaristic conservatives. A piece I wrote about the bipartisan nature of the pro-war foreign policy establishment was featured in antiwar.com during the 2004 Dem convention.

      Reply this comment
      • 912CalGal
        912CalGal 17 May, 2014, 16:34

        Chris,

        Where do you get off categorizing people as social conservatives or militaristic conservatives and what do those terms mean to you? Are those the only types of conservatives that you see through your libertarian lens?

        I prefer to use the terms small government, free market, and individual liberty supporting people which translates to Constitutional Conservatives. We are not for what the traditional GOP has come to represent which is crony capitalists (who are not really capitalists) and big government/big business supporters. Defined that way, the GOP is not that much different than the Democrats. Both are for big government but from a different angle. Either way, both support excessive regulation and trampling of individual rights in favor of the collective. Given that definition of the GOP, Neal “Kash & Karry” is the perfect representative of the establishment GOP. That is why the GOP is in trouble. Why vote for Democrat-lite (establishment GOP) when you can get the real thing–the Democrats? That’s why the Republican Party has lost traction in California. They don’t offer any alternatives or a vision for the future.

        BTW, speaking of “corporate rent-seeking” you might want to check out Darryl Steinberg and SB375 which is a gift to big developers and financial institutions to support Plan Bay Area with high density housing near mass transit. last I checked, he is a Democrat. Anything to say about that?

        Reply this comment
  4. Steve Mehlman
    Steve Mehlman 16 May, 2014, 17:59

    “Kash-N-Karry’s TARP role “helped” dole out other peoples money to his Wall Street buddies.”

    You’re mistaken Rexie. It was the eight years of deregulation and turning a blind eye to abuses on Wall Street and the banking industry under the Bush administration that sent our life savings to the elites on Wall Street. TARP was only a symptom of a disease contracted years earlier.

    Reply this comment
    • Howard Myers
      Howard Myers 17 May, 2014, 11:40

      Steve, if you are going to sling mud, please be accurate. The financial meltdown was accelerated when the Clinton administration pushed Fannie Mae to make risky loans. http://www.nytimes.com/1999/09/30/business/fannie-mae-eases-credit-to-aid-mortgage-lending.html “…will encourage those banks to extend home mortgages to individuals whose credit is generally not good enough to qualify for conventional loans.“
      “Fannie Mae, the nation’s biggest underwriter of home mortgages, has been under increasing pressure from the Clinton Administration to expand mortgage loans among low and moderate income people and felt pressure from stock holders to maintain its phenomenal growth in profits.”
      Steve, just because a lie is repeated often enough that people believe it, doesn’t make it true.
      And don’t forget the Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999, largely deregulating financial institutions to do virtually whatever they wanted, and the Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000 deregulated derivatives. All before George Bush’s took office.

      Reply this comment
  5. Mimi Steel
    Mimi Steel 17 May, 2014, 08:22

    Disappointing that a publication of the caliber of Cal Watchdog has to resort to ad hominem attacks on Tom Donnely ny calling his racist and dumb. I can only conclude that you have run out of substantive arguments against his policies and you are trying to creat fear and loathing among the low information voter. Very sad

    Reply this comment
    • Steve Mehlman
      Steve Mehlman 17 May, 2014, 09:43

      Chris, thanks for the clarification.

      Mimi Steel and 912CalGal (or one in the same), your identical posts one minute apart made my morning. But, if you are going to support a candidate, it might help to get his name right (Tom Donnelly?). Talk about “low information” voters. LOL.

      Reply this comment
      • 912CalGal
        912CalGal 17 May, 2014, 16:14

        Steve and Chris,

        Yes. I am the same person. I entered the info twice because it did not look like it was recorded the first time. Sorry for the confusion.

        As to the misspelling of Tim’s last name, I was on my iPad and did not catch the error. But of course, I’m sure that discredits me in your eyes as one of his dumb supporters.

        It is truly a shame that the level of discourse in the country has descended to the Saul Alinsky tactics of isolate the target and marginalize him. On the other hand, if you have to resort to that type of petty name calling, you have lost the argument.

        PS. BTW you wrote “Mimi Steel and 912CalGal (OR one in the same)”. Didn’t you mean (ARE one in the same)? I guess we all can make mistakes-even someone as perfect and condescending as you.

        Reply this comment
  6. 912CalGal
    912CalGal 17 May, 2014, 08:43

    Disappointing that a publication of the caliber of Cal Watchdog has to resort to ad hominem attacks on Tom Donnely by calling him racist and dumb. I can only conclude that you have run out of substantive arguments against his policies and you are trying to creat fear and loathing among the low information voter. Very sad

    Reply this comment
  7. Howard Myers
    Howard Myers 17 May, 2014, 12:15

    (Easy to see how a person could duplicate a comment. It just sits there with no indication it has been submitted.)
    Chris you said “You can hunt until your eyes fall out, and you won’t find me defending social conservatives or militaristic conservatives.” That would almost lead me to believe there are types or categories of conservatives you would defend. I would be interested in knowing if you are interested in telling. A brief look at your blog didn’t show any.
    I believe Tom Donnelly to be a principled conservative, albeit an imperfect one. I agree with Tom regarding the need to make california more friendly to businesses instead of chasing them out of the state. And the schools are a disgrace. Our entire state is being run by the rich unions and nobody has the courage to call them or the corrupt politicians on it.
    It isn’t that surprising when you chose to chide Mimi, above, for a double submission and leaving an ‘l’ out of Tom’s name instead of addressing her issue. But then that is what she was complaining about, you using attack instead of substance. Nice of you to demonstrate that ability even further.

    Reply this comment
  8. Steve Mehlman
    Steve Mehlman 17 May, 2014, 15:04

    (Easy to see how a person could duplicate a comment. It just sits there with no indication it has been submitted.)

    Right Howard, and then you submit the same exact post one minute later under a different name? LOL.

    I’ll let Chris defend himself. But maybe he is a fiscal conservative. I can remember when the Republican Party was strongly fiscally conservative but supported things like civil rights and immigration. That has changed. and not for the better.

    Finally, Howard, your candidate’s name is TIM Donnelly, not TOM Donnelly. You also got it wrong.

    Reply this comment
    • Howard Myers
      Howard Myers 17 May, 2014, 15:49

      Steve, do you believe Republicans don’t support civil rights? What do you base that on? Are you a democrat at heart and want to believe the Democrat party is no longer the party of the KKK and George Wallace or Al Gore Sr. that fought the civil rights legislation with many other Democrats. It isn’t the Republicans that have torn the black families apart by building “Uncle Sam’s Plantation” as Star Parker describes in her book. It isn’t the Republicans that forced schools to discriminate against white and asian students. No, you don’t want to talk about the Republicans vs. Democrats when it comes down to actual, factual civil rights. Maybe in the double speak of the left you can make a case but not in a sane world.
      Immigration? Are you one of those that believes our immigration system is broken? How would we know? we haven’t used it in years. We have laws but are afraid to use them because someone might call us names.
      It doesn’t matter which side you are on if the outcome is the destruction of anything resembling conservatism.

      Reply this comment
      • Steve Mehlman
        Steve Mehlman 17 May, 2014, 17:27

        Guess you never heard of Nixon’s famous “southern strategy.” That’s where the Republicans courted and won the people like George Wallace and the KKK who used to be southern Democrats. Their descendants are all Republicans now.

        It’s Republicans who bring nooses with effigies of the President to their rallies. It’s Republicans who do everything possible to limit the opportunity to vote, especially in minority areas. It’s Republicans who refuse to give green cards to American servicemen who have fought for our country and who won’t let the children of illegal immigrants–who themselves have done nothing illegal–go to college.

        If that kind of bigotry and hatred defines today’s conservative, God help us.

        Reply this comment
        • Howard Myers
          Howard Myers 17 May, 2014, 18:01

          Well thank you for clarifying your beliefs.
          The reason the black voting block in the south started voting Democrat was the democrats, along with a compliant media, convinced the general public that the democrats sponsored and passed the civil rights laws. In fact there were more republican votes for it than democrat. One forceful democrat that opposed it was, ironically enough, Al Gore Sr. Then, as documented in history, the democrat ‘great society’ paid more in welfare if there was no man in the house. Worked well to get votes but tore the black families apart like nothing else. Unless you count the many black babies that were killed in the womb by an organization founded by eugenics enthusiast Margaret Sanger. Her plan was to control the black population and the democrats helped her make that a reality. A person can argue women’s choice, women’s rights, women’s health but you can’t argue with the fact that black babies are aborted almost four times as often as white babies. Why does no one seem to care about that?
          Civil right? Democrats? Really? I don’t think so.

          Reply this comment
          • Steve Mehlman
            Steve Mehlman 18 May, 2014, 11:30

            “In fact there were more republican votes for it than democrat.”

            Flat out LIE. Here are the facts about the 1965 Voting Rights Act: The Senate passed the bill by a 77-19 vote (Democrats 47-16, Republicans 30-2); only Senators representing Southern states voted against it. The House passed the Voting Rights Act by a 333-85 vote (Democrats 221-61, Republicans 112-24).

            And you still haven’t answered why the KKK block in the South became Republicans?

          • Howard Myers
            Howard Myers 18 May, 2014, 12:06

            Steve,
            There were several version voted on. The orig House version D-61%, R-80; Cloture in the senate D-66%, R-82%, Senate Version D-69%, R-82%; Senate version in the House D-63%, R-80%. The bill was going nowhere without the strong support from Republicans. The Dems needed Republican votes to shut down the DEMOCRAT filibuster.
            As for the KKK being Republicans, that is your fantasy. I will let you address it.

          • Steve Mehlman
            Steve Mehlman 18 May, 2014, 13:17

            “In fact there were more republican votes for it than democrat”

            That’s what you said, Howard. Not percentages of votes, actual votes. Nice spin, though.

            And here’s a simple question for you: If the Voting Rights Act was up for a vote in TODAY’s Congress, would the majority of Republicans vote for it or against it?

            No more spin, please. Just answer the question.

        • 912CalGal
          912CalGal 17 May, 2014, 18:54

          Allen West, Thomas Sowell,Mia Love, Deena Borelli, Clarence Thomas,Ben Carson

          Reply this comment
          • Howard Myers
            Howard Myers 17 May, 2014, 19:26

            Exactly!
            Conservatives.
            But the ever so ‘caring’ liberals? Not a peep. In fact you are attacked if you say anything.

          • Donkey
            Donkey 18 May, 2014, 10:09

            Behind closed doors every liberal berates them as “Uncle and Auntie Tom’s”.
            🙂

          • Howard Myers
            Howard Myers 18 May, 2014, 11:45

            Didn’t mention Allen West will be speaking at The Conservative Forum next year.

          • Steve Mehlman
            Steve Mehlman 18 May, 2014, 16:26

            Phil Robertson, Cliven Bundy, Fred Phelps, Pamela Geller

            Conservatives

          • Howard Myers
            Howard Myers 18 May, 2014, 17:33

            Oh yeah, a great liberal pastime, giving conservatives and Republicans someone to disown and throw under the bus. You wouldn’t do it so often if too many Republicans didn’t fall for it and throw conservatives under the bus. Not buying here, sell it somewhere else. But if you want to see Pam Geller she will be at the forum in october. Come by and throw her under the bus yourself.

          • Howard Myers
            Howard Myers 18 May, 2014, 17:33

            Oh yeah, a great liberal pastime, giving conservatives and Republicans someone to disown and throw under the bus. You wouldn’t do it so often if too many Republicans didn’t fall for it and throw conservatives under the bus. Not buying here, sell it somewhere else. But if you want to see Pam Geller she will be at the forum in october. Come by and throw her under the bus yourself.

          • Steve Mehlman
            Steve Mehlman 18 May, 2014, 17:43

            If the Voting Rights Act was up for a vote in TODAY’s Congress, would the majority of Republicans vote for it or against it?

            Why won’t you answer the question, Howard? Because you and I both know what the answer is?

            BTW, thank you for the invitation, but I think I’ll pass on listening to Ms. Geller. I can always link to http://www.themadjewess.com and get all that kind of bigotry and hate without leaving home.

            And I’m sorry Phil and Cliven couldn’t make your forum. Maybe George Zimmerman isn’t busy that day.

          • Howard Myers
            Howard Myers 18 May, 2014, 20:09

            Steve, did I see someone here or another blog refer to you as a Libertarian? Must be another of my many mistakes. Nobody can spew hate and be as intolerant as a leftie.
            But I will say one thing: I am a man that has always enjoyed a good sense of humor. In that vein, a word of advice; don’t quit your day job.
            And no, I don’t feel like playing the VRA game.

          • Steve Mehlman
            Steve Mehlman 18 May, 2014, 20:19

            If the Voting Rights Act was up for a vote in TODAY’s Congress, would the majority of Republicans vote for it or against it? Stop spying on me and Answer the question, Howard.

          • Howard Myers
            Howard Myers 18 May, 2014, 20:25

            Steve, if you want an answer ask a serious question. Enough of ‘do you still beat your wife’.

          • Steve Mehlman
            Steve Mehlman 18 May, 2014, 20:39

            If the Voting Rights Act was up for a vote in TODAY’s Congress, would the majority of Republicans vote for it or against it?

          • Steve Mehlman
            Steve Mehlman 19 May, 2014, 07:14

            Hey Howard. Why don’t you invite Commissioner Copeland to your forum? He’ll fit right in.

            Former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney ripped a New Hampshire police commissioner for using a racial slur during a conversation about President Barack Obama.

            Wolfeboro Police Commissioner Robert Copeland acknowledged using the slur in an email to fellow police commissioners this week.

            “I believe I did use the ‘N’ word in reference to the current occupant of the Whitehouse,” Copeland said in the email. “For this, I do not apologize — he meets and exceeds my criteria for such.”

            In a statement to the Boston Herald, Romney called on Copeland to apologize and resign.

            “The vile epithet used and confirmed by the commissioner has no place in our community,” Romney said. “He should apologize and resign.”

            Political leaders and residents of Wolfeboro, a predominately white town, have also called on Copeland to resign. Wolfeboro Town Manager David Owen called Copeland’s comments “appalling” and “reprehensible.”

  9. 912CalGal
    912CalGal 18 May, 2014, 10:22

    There you go with the name calling again. And you don’t do it behind closed doors. You insult them right to their faces. It’s quite ironic. I can accept them for who they are and the principles that they stand for (yet you call conservatives racists) while you denigrate them for straying from the Democrat Plantation as if you consider them too stupid to have an independent thought (and you pat yourself on the back for being a so moral and ethical). I guess you can’t stand minorities who break with your collective.

    Saul Alinsky would be proud of all the thoughtless drones trained in his tactics who only want to tear people down for having a different opinion. When you have no facts to win an argument or when the facts contradict your opinion, you shout racism

    Pretty sad.

    BTW, Donkey, your handle is quite appropriate.

    Reply this comment
  10. Queeg
    Queeg 18 May, 2014, 22:31

    Why worry about losers?

    Move on.

    Reply this comment

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