Juvenile justice: The latest from San Diego Mayor Bob Filner

April 16, 2013

By Chris Reed

Sideshow.Bob.FilnerNewly elected San Diego Mayor Bob Filner basically owes his political career to the courage he showed as a Freedom Rider in the early 1960s. It’s the card he plays to cast himself in a better light whenever anyone notices all the different ways he shows he’s a bully with a wide mean streak.

But it’s not a card he can use with Andrew Jones, the no. 2 attorney in the San Diego City Attorney’s Office. The mayor’s 2013-14 budget, released Monday, only targets one agency for cuts: the City Attorney’s Office, an obvious and petty outgrowth of Filner’s attempt to depict City Attorney Jan Goldsmith as his version of Emmanuel Goldstein.

Not only does Filner’s 2013-14 spending plan call for cuts, supporting documents specify whom should be laid off by the city attorney.

Which brings us to the saga of Andrew Jones:

“At least one of the 13 city attorney employees whose job would be eliminated said he felt he was being personally targeted by Filner for standing up to him.

“Executive Assistant City Attorney Andrew Jones, Goldsmith’s second-in-command, said he has shut down meetings with Filner in which the mayor treated attorneys poorly by shouting and screaming at them.

“’He’s (verbally) attacked me in closed session to the extent that at one point he asked if I would sit in the back of the room,’ said Jones, who is black. ‘I, of course, considered it something similar to asking Rosa Parks to sit in the back of the bus. I was extremely offended by it but in deference to my boss I decided not to make a big deal out of it. But clearly he has a problem with me. I’m not sure why.’

“Filner, a longtime civil rights activist, participated in the famous Freedom Rides as a teenager in 1961.”

That’s our Bob Filner. Down here in San Diego, we’re all very proud of him.

OK, maybe not.

But for journalists, there’s no question he is our fodder figure.

 

9 comments

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  1. Steve Mehlman
    Steve Mehlman 16 April, 2013, 08:26

    Chris’s paper, the UT, is accused of selling ad space in last year’s election to Mayor Filner’s opponent at a far cheaper rate than to the mayor’s campaign. No bias here, boss. LOL.

    Reply this comment
  2. CalWatchdog
    CalWatchdog Author 16 April, 2013, 10:06

    Steve: Unlike the supposedly “objective,” but really far-left, New York Times, L.A. Times, Washington Post, etc., we don’t hide that we have a philosophical orientation. We favor free markets and limited government. We insist on accurate news reporting, but we’re up front about “where we’re coming from.”

    Also, Chris Reed is an editorial writer with the U-T, so he’s supposed to have opinions there.

    — John Seiler

    Reply this comment
  3. Shaun
    Shaun 16 April, 2013, 13:26

    Its so comical to me that liberal progressives cry like babies when they feel the news is slanted in a direction other than their direction. Yet you don’t hear them make a squeek about the ratios of those outlets. Fox new is 1 outlet vs. NBC, ABC, MSNBC, CNN etc… The UT is 1 paper in the trenches against the masses. The question to ask yourself is this… Is the story true? Yes. Then how does that show bias? It doesn’t.

    Reply this comment
  4. SkippingDog
    SkippingDog 16 April, 2013, 18:49

    John: How does your admission that CWD is not at all objective square with your mission claim that “CalWatchdog adheres to traditional journalistic standards”?

    Are you adhering to the journalism standards of the old “pre-professional” broadsheet era? If so, why bother to pretend?

    Reply this comment
  5. Steve Mehlman
    Steve Mehlman 16 April, 2013, 19:49

    John,

    The issue I raised has nothing to do with Chris’ opinion. We are talking about a paper giving a monetary advantage to one candidate over another by selling them cheaper ad space. The “far-left” LA Times (pardon me while I wipe away the tears from laughing so hard) as well as the other papers you mention have never done that to a candidate. Where I come from, that’s called cheating. But I guess anything goes as long as the candidate is “free market, limited government.”

    Reply this comment
  6. SkippingDog
    SkippingDog 16 April, 2013, 22:41

    I believe that kind of thing is legally known as “a donation in kind.”

    Reply this comment
  7. Brown delta trout
    Brown delta trout 17 April, 2013, 08:32

    The commies won’t be happy until they control all the sources of media.

    Reply this comment
  8. CalWatchdog
    CalWatchdog Author 17 April, 2013, 14:05

    Steve: I wish the U-T had not done that. But their ad practices don’t affect the writing of Chris Reed, a fine journalist whom I have known since we worked together on the Register editorial page a decade ago.

    And the L.A. Times obviously is far-left. Its editorial pages and columnists have supported almost every bond measure and tax increase in this state in the 26 years I’ve been here. Its news coverage is biased in the extreme. And the Times exerts far more influence over California than any other news outlet, including the U-T.

    Their own reporter David Shaw even wrote a story series in the Times in 1990, confessing, “Abortion bias seeps into news.”

    Link: http://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-me-shaw01jul01,0,5601598.story

    — John Seiler

    Reply this comment
  9. Brown delta trout
    Brown delta trout 17 April, 2013, 22:00

    Are you sure that’s a homo sapien that has eyes on the side of it’s head? This is like a bad movie.

    Reply this comment

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